guilherme henrique

PREMIERE / "Abyssal" / José Francisco / INTERVIEW

As our feed thus far this summer can attest, skate production has been booming in Brazil recently - or so it may seem to the foes most unfamiliar with anything but the tip of that exotic iceberg. As discussed in our recent interview with young Rio De Janeiro local, Sergio Santoro, in reality, the energy stemming from the entire - massive - country is actually timeless, and strong of as many personifications as it has engendered individual, local scenes throughout the decades. It really should be a given that, like most everywhere even remotely skatable on the planet, Brazil always bred generations worth of locally renowned legends and tales and yet, to this day the language barrier can still persist when it comes to exporting such sunshine overseas - prompting many to summarize "Brazilian skateboarding" just to #slidesandgrinds and the occasional holidays trip video upload, for the lack of more accessible information, accurate orientation and generally easier access to the reality of the insiders' culture.
 
Now, the topic isn't without being reminiscent of a wider debate within skateboarding and its most emotionally involved enthusiasts altogether; despite pop culture having swallowed the image of the activity whole over the past two decades, essentially reappropriating it for mass branding purposes (with the positive side effect of potentially introducing some of its magic to many a new kid), who's to say that skateboarding no longer belongs to those who are actually doing it? Who's to say that worldwide validation and unicorn lives matter, when secluded communities grow so strong by themselves that the dimension of their existence alone suffices to render the whole idea of serious competition in skateboarding as invalid as a mere joke?
 
But now, validation and recognition are two different things. Whilst the former is delusional, the latter is all about duly paying tribute to the most interesting local productions and crazy activists behind them, opening borders, gaining perspectives and building bridges over trenches. In today's case, with the presentation of "ABYSSAL", said trenches are as rough and rugged as the average LIVE reader should expect by now if they have been following our incessant stream of Brazilian e-postcards. The film is by José Francisco, based in Anápolis and participant in the eponymous multimedia collective; and it is now free to watch above but before you do go peep, make sure you keep scrolling a bit further down, for an intense 5W's session with quite the sincere video maker!

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