S.F. butter

Once again, our mates from down under over at Butter Goods demonstrate the extent of their networking skills since after a recent collaboration with DC Shoes which most notably produced this exquisite mix of Josh Roberts' filming and Josh Kalis' skating, today, they're back with another one: this time with FTC, San Francisco's most legendary skateshops that already sponsored some of the original writers of modern street skateboarding, as early as in the early nineties. We'll send you back to "Finally" for the basics, then to "Penal Code 100A" for applied physics.

In order to celebrate the launch (both online, and in-store at the S.F. and Barcelona locations) of the corresponding product, the world is granted two minutes of raw skating straight out of the downhill mecca, and from the lens of Zach Chamberlin's beloved VX-1000 (at least since the Rasa Libre videos), which is always unarguable. On the other side of the lens is quite the all-stars roser: Ben Gore crushes the spots, Ryan Barlow views them as hurdles, Roger Krebs improbably kickflip frontside wallrides and Chris Athans jumps from truck to truck.

All is right with the world!

And for an extra bonus of similar flavors, here's a reminder of the Magenta x FTC promo from a few years back, already...

French Twist

Mickaël Germond, aka. Gazon, from Lyon, should not need what would be a reintroduction - let's send the most curious of you back to, say, "Entre Deux" for a minute (or ten). Now for years, the man has been a representative of shoe giant Vans and, now formerly, of Antiz Skateboards (the influence of which only fueled his open mind when it comes to spot approach); but from then on, he will be sporting the colors of the Bordeaux-based, Rave Skateboards. Speaking of which - their new video, "Family And Friends", just dropped; the Paris premiere was just a few days ago, and also what officially revealed Mika's recent association with the brand to a flabbergasted audience, as no less than his own dedicated section started playing. Well, that very section is what we're sharing today, courtesy of Solo Skate Mag alongside this interview with Mika himself, again for the curious!

SLO Country

"Nothing Less" is an eight-minute audiovisual gem out of Slovenia via the mind of Kristijan Stramic (with some technical help from, notably, LIVE regular Matej Počervina), that aims - and does well - at encapsulating the essence of the local skate scene, which just so appears to look super healthy. The filmmakers' approach is quite out of the ordinary, with a progressive sequencing of cinematic shots - first of urban settings, then of the Proper Skateparks locals for a mini ramp section featuring wild creative beast Deso, and cooking lessons from Tibor Rep; then, we get to catch up with national legend and underground artist Ali Jusović for some news and freestyle in between two mega ramp missions, before it all (only literally) starts going downhill thanks to some countryside bombing, notably featuring Tomaž Šantl, of Original Copy fame. The adventure finally wraps up on a D.I.Y. note, as though to remind the world that Slovenian photographer Peter Fettich just released "Rispect The Boul", a photo book assembled as a recap of years shared by fellow local humans around the local pouring of concrete and cementing of pool coping, only available in a limited edition as every copy is unique with a skated cover (sweet concept), most notably in Europe from Palomino, here!

How to impossible

How about an 'audiovisual postcard' from New York City, sent in by Malmö filmer David Lindberg (whose Vimeo account bears witness to his activity)? Filmed over just a week last September, partly thanks to the services of our photographer and defender homie Pep Kim, the resulting montage features two minutes of Maxi Schaible and John Baragwanath footage intertwined with urban film shots as well as various atmosphere-enhancing editing techniques, for a certain cinematic feel.

Pale grey eyes

The Grey Area Polish homies are back, still with O.G. Kuba Kaczmarczyk (interviewed here, in company of recent Danny Fuenzalida footage) at the wheel, driving in an audiovisual style that seemingly gets more refined with every new output. In addition to the local cities of Warsaw and Kraków, and of a chunk of Ukraine, the filmmaker's territory now also expands to Croatia where he notably connected with Tom Remillard at various editions of the Vladimir Film Festival; so of course, Tom has a full part (or two) in this new production, alongside the notorious Kraków Kids (interviewed here) Kuba Brniak, Michal Zarzycki and Franek Kramarczyk, but also Eniz Fazliov, Michal Juras, Didrik Galasso or Chilian talent Juan Jose Moraga. The spots are crazy, the tricks are quality, the rain is universal: a solid bite into some healthy, savory grey fruit, as usual. Full article including stories and a photo gallery over at Free Skate Mag, here.

Against Le Corbu

At this point, introducing you yet again to Murilo Romão of Flanantes productions would almost qualify as insulting; an offense that still would not strike as deep as Le Corbusier's approach to architecture and urban planning, notably based on the division and structuring of public space according to the singular, primarily intended utilisation of each element of its design - basically summing up, and stripping down the city to nothing but its most basic, uttermost practical functions with no space reserved for the wandering of the soul and other vagrancies - both of the spiritual and physical type, whether or not on wheels. Highlighting the dangers of such a vision, most notably the breach it creates between individuals and a certain innate right of theirs to freely enjoy their direct environment, Murilo hits back with "Against Le Corbu", a sixteen-minute audiovisual trip to Brasilia, a location intended as "the city of the future" as soon as its construction in the sixties following in the footprints of Le Corbusier's bleak utopia, only in order to take over its spots with one fine crew of gentlemen (including LIVE regular Cotinz) as accomplices.

As far as the spots themselves, well... Let's say that just rolling up to most of them already makes one ponder all the possible parallels between skating and taming some kind of wild beast.

Also featured: a sweet photo gallery courtesy of Renato Zokreta.

PREMIERE / Zeropolis "LOCAL"

Zeropolis skateshop has been persisting in Lille, Northern France, for over twenty years now.

Lille is one of those places where the local, both meteorological and architectural conditions essentially require a certain degree of passion in anyone there trying to take up skateboarding, in such a landscape of wet bricks (formerly the regional norm before the edification of skateparks such as Halle de Glisse: one of Europe's first modern "street parks", the avant-garde construction of which was tackled as early as 2005, just as every European skater and their neighbor were getting sick of prefab ramps).

The motivation we're talking seems unwilling to discriminate against specific generations, judging from the impression resulting from this new (Zeropolis) video production: "Local" is a twenty-one-minute audiovisual collage in mostly high definition, carefully crafted by Thomas Larive.

More Medium!

Throughout the years and their subsequent takes on what makes "A Happy Medium", the Buster and Hunter O'Shea brothers really never stopped regularly and repeatedly showcasing how tight of a grip the purpose of representing the Arizona skate scene has on their existence! Already a decade ago, the first installment in the series already wasn't their first full-length effort and since then, they have birthed three more and that's if you don't count (but why wouldn't you?) their side productions such as Sometimes Skateboards (and its video) on the side... Arid sun-bathed, 3CCD-armed workhorses! Anyway, this fifth "A Happy Medium" is looking like a comeback to the roots, a turn the guys already started to initiate last year with the fourth edition: Marty Anderson, balloons... The aesthetics of the first piece of the series is not just present, but repeated in full force and whilst some might find it funny that their love for skateboarding seemingly crystallized sometime around 2008 (... things could have been a lot worse), their skateboarding itself really didn't, as legends such as Johnrob Moore or John Motta only seem to get younger as they age. We can't wait!

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