"Polygone" / Florent Theron / GALLERY

Consciousness of the urban space has to be a hot topic this day: amongst many other things, LIVE has told you about the Bordeaux, France-based project "PLAY" before and, recently, Ocean Howell even reconciled with his first love long enough for a few talks at the recent Pushing Boarders in Malmö (as well as a three-sixty kickflip).

If the fruit of such considerations is only now blooming here and there throughout the surface of the globe in apparently a rather simultaneous manner, that's only because it's been nurtured underground by the skateboarders' perpetual frustration regarding the inadequacies of the established society with the reality of their practice of choice - for a long, long time.

In Nice, France, Florent Theron has been working on "Polygone" for over a year already; a personal project that he eventually materialized in fanzine form, for the lack of an additional, better-suited dimension. Oddly enough, despite both projects being completely disconnected at the root, Florent's interpretation of the skatable structure shares sensibilities with Leo and Nicolas' take on the subject with "PLAY": the obstacle is summarized to its most basic geometrical shape (in this case, three triangles), and primary colors that inspire a Mondrianesque cognitive deciphering.

Images aplenty were captured by Fred Schwal, and then laid out on paper by Florent himself, strong of his Le Huit experience as he is. Let's hand him the mic for a sec.

PREMIERE / "Abyssal" / José Francisco / INTERVIEW

As our feed thus far this summer can attest, skate production has been booming in Brazil recently - or so it may seem to the foes most unfamiliar with anything but the tip of that exotic iceberg. As discussed in our recent interview with young Rio De Janeiro local, Sergio Santoro, in reality, the energy stemming from the entire - massive - country is actually timeless, and strong of as many personifications as it has engendered individual, local scenes throughout the decades. It really should be a given that, like most everywhere even remotely skatable on the planet, Brazil always bred generations worth of locally renowned legends and tales and yet, to this day the language barrier can still persist when it comes to exporting such sunshine overseas - prompting many to summarize "Brazilian skateboarding" just to #slidesandgrinds and the occasional holidays trip video upload, for the lack of more accessible information, accurate orientation and generally easier access to the reality of the insiders' culture.
 
Now, the topic isn't without being reminiscent of a wider debate within skateboarding and its most emotionally involved enthusiasts altogether; despite pop culture having swallowed the image of the activity whole over the past two decades, essentially reappropriating it for mass branding purposes (with the positive side effect of potentially introducing some of its magic to many a new kid), who's to say that skateboarding no longer belongs to those who are actually doing it? Who's to say that worldwide validation and unicorn lives matter, when secluded communities grow so strong by themselves that the dimension of their existence alone suffices to render the whole idea of serious competition in skateboarding as invalid as a mere joke?
 
But now, validation and recognition are two different things. Whilst the former is delusional, the latter is all about duly paying tribute to the most interesting local productions and crazy activists behind them, opening borders, gaining perspectives and building bridges over trenches. In today's case, with the presentation of "ABYSSAL", said trenches are as rough and rugged as the average LIVE reader should expect by now if they have been following our incessant stream of Brazilian e-postcards. The film is by José Francisco, based in Anápolis and participant in the eponymous multimedia collective; and it is now free to watch above but before you do go peep, make sure you keep scrolling a bit further down, for an intense 5W's session with quite the sincere video maker!

History, waffles and lettres d'amour

"Loveletters to Skateboarding" is the increasingly popular video podcast hosted by Jeff Grosso and his peeps; whilst on the other side of the lens and in the editing room, resides the role of our friends at Six Stair (most notably renowned for their work on the Antihero video "The Body Corporate", but not just that one), and Vans is in charge of the make-up. Recently, the latest episodes of the show have been region-based and it just so happens that France is the subject of the newest one! The guys did very well at conducting a thorough research job and, despite their humble claim to not be trying to make a documentary on the history of French skateboarding altogether per se, the eventual product resembles just that pretty well and features interventions from many an interesting, if not pivotal character in the local culture, as well as vintage, still moving pictures and tales aplenty, as though told on a seven-hour drive from Paris to Marseille, going through Lyon, and then recounted on the way back - in love mail.

Théo Moga x Hugo Bernatas / PREMIERE

French Vendôme native, Lyon-based Hugo Bernatas is a prolific, independent skate filmer who regularly floods this or that online channel with his productions, and has been for a long time already. 

His new output is a web clip featuring a young Théo Moga whose skateboarding you might already have caught a glimpse of, recently, in "B(ee)r", the independent full-length video from Montpellier by Bastien Regeste (arguably the closest equivalent to "Fully Flared" in this country and time).

Now here, in the span of two black-and-white minutes, Théo reinterprets some of the most classic spots the capital of Gaul is timelessly notorious for putting on display, and of course makes sure to tune them to the tone of the latest update of iOS that day. And Hugo tells us more...

 

Sergio Santoro / INTERVIEW / "Original Rocker" / PREMIERE

About the Sergio Santoro phenomenon; well, its greatest strength has to be that it speaks for itself, as both the character and his skating style have been making an Internet sensation for quite a few years now - as though a testimony to how genuine passion is bound to keep overflowing over time, all the while transcending geographical and language barriers. Sergio's skating is quite unique, a logical consequence of growing up in an era allowing possible peeks and picks into a worldwide array of inspirations, resulting in a trick repertoire and body language that transcends fashion. But all the transcending aside, one verb that's frequently a part of Sergio's expressed delivery (as the interview below can attest) is "exploring"; really, Sergio is but an artless, curious mind with genuine appreciation for everything positive in life, and an aura that's bound to absorb you the second he pops off a smile.

Whilst he's actually out there casually scoring crazy Instagram points to the point of catching the attention of the Californian economic elite, and many of his own people love him to the point of developing expectations, Sergio's primarily consideration seems to remain skateboarding every day and appreciating every single second of just that; thereby shattering many potential preconceived opinions regarding e-fame, or impulses of territoriality. Sergio knows that neither him, nor the Brazil scene has to prove anything to the world; so below, we discussed ways to spread awareness about its incessant, quality local productions of all kinds, the unique styles present there but also throughout the world, the language barrier with non-Portuguese speaking countries and much more.

The heart knows no borders and who better than Sergio to represent sincere dedication over any other arbitrary construction of the mind. Hoping that the sunshine Sergio radiates conveys in words, LIVE is thankful and honored to present the first Sergio Santoro interview for a European magazine and therefore, a non-Portuguese speaking audience.

Spelta Mia

A brand new web part from Ruben SpeltaMagenta's newest chouchou, just hit the Internets straight out of the Quartersnacks oven. A special spelt-based pizza prepared by Patrick Frunzio, whose recipe comprises all the classic toppings: fresh VX-1000 clips, some hot chopped ledge dancing and even some Milano Centrale Stazione instances peppered here and there - for the heritage.

Evisen x Daidō Moriyama

Daidō Moriyama (森山大道) is a renowned Japanese photographer born October 10th, 1938 in Ikeda, Osaka. His body of works is notorious for being a testimony to the evolution of society in the post-war Japan of the second half of the twentieth century.

As far as the first half of the twenty-first century is concerned however, it is the Evisen guys who are apparently quite excited about carrying to the torch, by productively documenting the evolution of society in the current post-skate Japan.

What goes around comes around with this new edit, one intended to promote a new line of decks that happens to be a strong collaboration with the aforementioned artist, a collection one can keep up with here as more and more models are going out of stock already. As per usual, everything is orchestrated to a home-made soundtrack whilst, in front of the lens, dance around the multiple and varied talents of Maru, Shinpei Ueno, Katsumi Minami, Koichiro Uehara, Laurence Keefe, Shor West, Seimi Miyahara and Kento Yoshioka.

D.J. Dub's tip: Murilo Romão

A former freelancer for SuGaR back when the magazine was still reviewing records (reviewing what?) naively thought he'd be the one to let us know on the many talents of Murilo Romão, although we've featured and presented his Flanantes productions throughout the years - quite frequently too, as the beast never seems to sleep. Anyway the point is, you might have heard of him before.

But what saves D.J. Dub's artlessness here is that this new clip features Murilo on the other side of the mirror, and lens; he's solely channeling himself through skating here, instead of computing behind the camera, making it a proper web part for SAT and Vibe, his shoe sponsor. Classic Brazilian spots: check - including some of the last footage at the legendary Vale) - but also some Portugal sightings, in between two demonstrations of proper balance on one truck (to be defined), and flip out skills.

"LOST" in London / PREMIERE

LIVE has shared South London-based filmer James 'D.J.' Davidson's independent productions in the past; namely "Shmara" - immortalizing an army of Russian skateboarders overtaking Shanghai the most noble way they know how. The editing was catchy, punchy and the utilization of the VX-1000 D.J. claims to love as far as in his personal Instagram handle, wisely optimized.

It has now been two years since D.J. returned back home from China, during which he didn't go without filming, or traveling. His new audiovisual offering, "Lost", is the eventual representation of that timespan, consisting in footage captured out of pure feel, resulting in a kaleidoscopic display of fragmented skate moments as D.J. himself explored more of his own existence and the world, as he even made it as far as Paris in his search for new directions, new thrills and new socks from Carrefour.

Existential doubts, maybe; an original and genuinely brillant video as a direct result, that's for sure. The author put a lot of himself into the craft of this little time capsule, which can really be felt.

Follow D.J. on YouTube, ici !

New Wave Film

We were bringing up Film Trucks as recently as not long ago at all - in Jérémie Daclin's Bigger Spin article, a recap of his legacy as the Lyon skateboarder who put Europe on the map of worldwide skateboarding for good in the late nineties, pretty much. Nowadays, Jérémie is still going at it, keeping himself busy without missing a beat after the disappearance of Cliché Skateboards with what claims to be the first ever truck company from the old continent.

Impeccable synchronicity as today, "Nouvelle Vague", a fifteen-minute montage made for Film Trucks by Guillaume Colucci just hit the sextuple V - a format one could argue makes for a modern equivalent of the ancient one of the full-length company video, as to better match nowadays's average attention span. But let's not disgress.

The editing works, and the imprint of Jérémie's visionary direction is strongly recognizable as the one also responsible for laying out the first blueprints for Cliché two decades ago. Out of the same ballpoint pen, the recipe is all laid out: charismatic B-roll intertwined with raw street prowess, VX-1000 cameras or anything remotely close to one, singular moments caught on tape and a homie vibe dipped in French sauce - title and double entendres included, as far as in the soundtrack. Because Jérémie believes in identity; Jérémie believes in skating as something personal, inspired and transcending the superficial aspects of its mainstream representation.

Generally a piece that's very reminiscent of "Bon Appétit" and French Fred's videos, a sweet surprise, and one that involves Jarne Verbruggen, Léo Valls, Anton Myhrvold, Adrien Coillard, Bastien Regeste, Bastien Marlin, Arno Wagner, Fred Plocq-Santos, Jérémie Daclin, Victor Campillo and Enzo Morel.

Last but not least, if ever around Venice Lyon on the 14th and 15th of September, please do not hesitate to join them guys on a tour of the local sidewalks of the most noble-or-at-least-decent kind - more info on the flyer below, drawn by none other than Mark Gonzales - évidemment.

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